📦 Free Shipping On All Orders
🚚💨 Fast Delivery From The USA!
Ted's Vintage Art
0
Find On Map

Old Maps of Vermont

1 - 24 of 313 Vintage Maps
Filter By Search
Map Type

Select A Country

Select A Country
Select A State

Clear Filters

    Vintage Vermont Maps
    The Green Mountain State of Vermont became a state in 1791, and countless beautiful, antique maps illustrate its history.

    You’ll find a number of old Vermont city maps in our archives, including Bristol, Burlington, Johnsbury, Middlebury, Montpelier (the state’s capital), and Rutland. And we also have county maps that include Addison, Bennington, Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, Orange, Orleans, Rutland, Washington, Windham, and Windsor.

    If you’re looking for a map for a specific Vermont city and don’t see it on this page, contact us, and we’ll be happy to check our archives. While our collections of vintage maps are extensive, there are still many more we’re restoring, and chances are we’ll have what you’re seeking.
    About Vermont
    The area now known as Vermont was inhabited for thousands of years before the Europeans arrived in the 1600s. Originally, the Abanaki people inhabited the land. The French were the first Europeans to arrive, and they established settlements for the beaver fur trade. The British later arrived in 1724 and would win control of Vermont by 1763. Vermont was admitted to the Union as the 14th state in 1791.

    Today, Vermont’s natural, forested landscape makes it a beautiful place to vacation. Tourists love to visit the state, from discovering hidden gems to visiting attractions, covered bridges, snow-covered mountains, and enjoying the beautiful annual fall foliage season.

    You might be surprised to learn that one of the most popular attractions in the state, especially for children, is the Ben & Jerry’s ice cream factory in Waterbury. Visitors can get a factory tour, and of course, the gift shop allows you to take your favorite flavors home with you. The story for Ben & Jerry began in 1978 when founders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield opened an ice cream shop inside a refurbished gas station in Burlington, about 30 miles from Waterbury.

    And of course, Vermont is famously known for being the top producer of maple syrup in the United States—the state produces about 1.5 million to 2 million gallons annually. Around 1,500 sugarhouses produce approximately 50 percent of the country’s maple syrup. Other key industries include the production of apples, cattle, dairy products, and electronics manufacturing, lumber, and, of course, tourism.

    Did you know that Vermont’s capital, Montpelier (named after a city in the south of France), is the smallest state capital in the United States? Its population is just over 7,200 people, although when daily commuters head to the state’s capital for jobs within the city limits, it swells to around 21,000. Montpelier consists of 10.3 square miles, with the Winooski River running along its downtown village.

    Famous names that hail from Vermont include John Deere (who started the company named after him), artist Norman Rockwell, former U.S. President Calvin Coolidge, and English writer Rudyard Kipling (who won a Nobel Prize for Literature).

    Finally, you won’t find any skyscrapers in the state of Vermont. The tallest building is Decker Towers, an 11-story apartment building in Burlington that’s 124 feet tall.

    More About These Maps

    Vintage Vermont Maps
    The Green Mountain State of Vermont became a state in 1791, and countless beautiful, antique maps illustrate its history.

    You’ll find a number of old Vermont city maps in our archives, including Bristol, Burlington, Johnsbury, Middlebury, Montpelier (the state’s capital), and Rutland. And we also have county maps that include Addison, Bennington, Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, Orange, Orleans, Rutland, Washington, Windham, and Windsor.

    If you’re looking for a map for a specific Vermont city and don’t see it on this page, contact us, and we’ll be happy to check our archives. While our collections of vintage maps are extensive, there are still many more we’re restoring, and chances are we’ll have what you’re seeking.
    About Vermont
    The area now known as Vermont was inhabited for thousands of years before the Europeans arrived in the 1600s. Originally, the Abanaki people inhabited the land. The French were the first Europeans to arrive, and they established settlements for the beaver fur trade. The British later arrived in 1724 and would win control of Vermont by 1763. Vermont was admitted to the Union as the 14th state in 1791.

    Today, Vermont’s natural, forested landscape makes it a beautiful place to vacation. Tourists love to visit the state, from discovering hidden gems to visiting attractions, covered bridges, snow-covered mountains, and enjoying the beautiful annual fall foliage season.

    You might be surprised to learn that one of the most popular attractions in the state, especially for children, is the Ben & Jerry’s ice cream factory in Waterbury. Visitors can get a factory tour, and of course, the gift shop allows you to take your favorite flavors home with you. The story for Ben & Jerry began in 1978 when founders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield opened an ice cream shop inside a refurbished gas station in Burlington, about 30 miles from Waterbury.

    And of course, Vermont is famously known for being the top producer of maple syrup in the United States—the state produces about 1.5 million to 2 million gallons annually. Around 1,500 sugarhouses produce approximately 50 percent of the country’s maple syrup. Other key industries include the production of apples, cattle, dairy products, and electronics manufacturing, lumber, and, of course, tourism.

    Did you know that Vermont’s capital, Montpelier (named after a city in the south of France), is the smallest state capital in the United States? Its population is just over 7,200 people, although when daily commuters head to the state’s capital for jobs within the city limits, it swells to around 21,000. Montpelier consists of 10.3 square miles, with the Winooski River running along its downtown village.

    Famous names that hail from Vermont include John Deere (who started the company named after him), artist Norman Rockwell, former U.S. President Calvin Coolidge, and English writer Rudyard Kipling (who won a Nobel Prize for Literature).

    Finally, you won’t find any skyscrapers in the state of Vermont. The tallest building is Decker Towers, an 11-story apartment building in Burlington that’s 124 feet tall.

    Copyright 2024 © Ted’s Vintage Art / Blase Media LLC