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Vintage Bosnia Maps

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Old Maps of Bosnia
Browse through our collection of Old Maps of Bosnia.

Bosnia, formally known as Bosnia and Herzegovina, is a country located between both south and southeast Europe, situated within the Balkans. The country borders Serbia, Montenegro, and Croatia. The country spans a total area of 51,129 square kilometers, or 19,441 square miles, which makes the country the 125th largest in the world. The capital and largest city is Sarajevo, and the country is home to a total estimated population of 3,475,000. The current Prime Minister of the country is Zoran Tegeltija, who has served in this position since 2019.

The country is mainly mountainous, as it is home to the central Dinaric Alps mountain range. The highest point within the country is the peak of the mountain Maglić, which stands at an altitude of 2,386 meters, or 7,828 feet high. Around 50% of the entire country is forested, with the main forested regions being in the center, east, and western parts of the country. There are seven major rivers within the entire country, and they are as follows: The Sava, Una, Sana, Vrbas, Bosna, Drina, and Neretva river. The Sava is the largest of these seven, and it drains into the Danube, a river basin which passes through ten European countries.The land of Bosnia can be divided into four different ecoregions which are: Balkan mixed forests, Dinaric Mountainous mixed forests, Pannonian mixed forest, and Illyrian deciduous forests. A great majority of trees within the country are either pine, beech, or oak. Fruits are very commonly grown within the country, such as grapes, apples, pears, as well as plums. Commonly found animals include bears, wolves, wild pigs, wildcats, chamois, otters, foxes, badgers, and falcons.

Following the Bosnian War, the economy faced a decline, with a 60% drop of GDP. The economy is dominated by industry and agriculture, which is followed by tourism as well as the service sector. The largest exports within the country’s economy are electricity, iron structures, seats, leather footwear, insulated wire, sawn wood, and hot-rolled iron bars. Between the years 1995 to 2020, Bosnia had the world’s third largest increase in tourism rates. In 2018, 1,883,772 tourists visited the country, which was a 43.5% increase from the year prior. One-third of Bosnia’s land is under cultivation, or is included in a pasture. The main crops of Bosnia include corn, potatoes, wheat, plums, cabbages, as well as apples.

Ever since the Yugoslav Wars that occurred in the 1990s, it has been difficult for a census to be taken due to political disagreements. In 1991, the country had a population of 4,369,319 people. By 1996, the population was at 3,764,425, which is a significant decrease. This can be attributed to the large migrations that occurred all throughout war. The five largest cities within Bosnia are Sarajevo, Banja Luka, Tuzla, Zenica, and Bijeljina. By the early 21st century, the birth rate had fallen and the death rates had started to increase, which is a commonly found feature of several European countries that underwent development.

Read More About Vintage Bosnia Maps

Old Maps of Bosnia
Browse through our collection of Old Maps of Bosnia.

Bosnia, formally known as Bosnia and Herzegovina, is a country located between both south and southeast Europe, situated within the Balkans. The country borders Serbia, Montenegro, and Croatia. The country spans a total area of 51,129 square kilometers, or 19,441 square miles, which makes the country the 125th largest in the world. The capital and largest city is Sarajevo, and the country is home to a total estimated population of 3,475,000. The current Prime Minister of the country is Zoran Tegeltija, who has served in this position since 2019.

The country is mainly mountainous, as it is home to the central Dinaric Alps mountain range. The highest point within the country is the peak of the mountain Maglić, which stands at an altitude of 2,386 meters, or 7,828 feet high. Around 50% of the entire country is forested, with the main forested regions being in the center, east, and western parts of the country. There are seven major rivers within the entire country, and they are as follows: The Sava, Una, Sana, Vrbas, Bosna, Drina, and Neretva river. The Sava is the largest of these seven, and it drains into the Danube, a river basin which passes through ten European countries.The land of Bosnia can be divided into four different ecoregions which are: Balkan mixed forests, Dinaric Mountainous mixed forests, Pannonian mixed forest, and Illyrian deciduous forests. A great majority of trees within the country are either pine, beech, or oak. Fruits are very commonly grown within the country, such as grapes, apples, pears, as well as plums. Commonly found animals include bears, wolves, wild pigs, wildcats, chamois, otters, foxes, badgers, and falcons.

Following the Bosnian War, the economy faced a decline, with a 60% drop of GDP. The economy is dominated by industry and agriculture, which is followed by tourism as well as the service sector. The largest exports within the country’s economy are electricity, iron structures, seats, leather footwear, insulated wire, sawn wood, and hot-rolled iron bars. Between the years 1995 to 2020, Bosnia had the world’s third largest increase in tourism rates. In 2018, 1,883,772 tourists visited the country, which was a 43.5% increase from the year prior. One-third of Bosnia’s land is under cultivation, or is included in a pasture. The main crops of Bosnia include corn, potatoes, wheat, plums, cabbages, as well as apples.

Ever since the Yugoslav Wars that occurred in the 1990s, it has been difficult for a census to be taken due to political disagreements. In 1991, the country had a population of 4,369,319 people. By 1996, the population was at 3,764,425, which is a significant decrease. This can be attributed to the large migrations that occurred all throughout war. The five largest cities within Bosnia are Sarajevo, Banja Luka, Tuzla, Zenica, and Bijeljina. By the early 21st century, the birth rate had fallen and the death rates had started to increase, which is a commonly found feature of several European countries that underwent development.

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