🛒 Buy 2 Maps, Get 3rd Map Free!
📦 Free Shipping On All Orders
🚚💨 Fast Delivery From The USA!
Ted's Vintage Art
Cart 0 $0.00
🛒 Buy 2 Maps, Get 3rd Map Free!
Ted's Vintage Art
Cart 0 $0.00

Vintage Iceland Maps

Filter By Search
Map Type
Select A State
1 - 16 of 1208 Vintage Maps

Old Maps of Iceland
Explore our collection of Old Maps of Iceland.

Iceland is a nordic island country located in the North Atlantic Ocean. With the entire country spanning an area of around 103,000 square kilometers (40,000 square miles), Iceland is the 18th largest island in the world, and the 2nd largest in Europe following Great Britain. It is also the most sparsely populated country in all of Europe with a total population of around 371,580 inhabitants. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík, which holds around 65% of the entire population. Iceland is home to a representative democracy and parliamentary republic, and is also the first country in the world to have a political party completely founded and led by women. The current president of Iceland is Guðni Th. Jóhannesson.

The island of Iceland is very geologically active and is home to 130 volcanoes. Of these 130, only around 30 are active. The highest elevation located within Iceland can be found at Hvannadalshnúker, rising around 2,110 meters (or 6,923 feet). Along with volcanoes being common, hot springs and geysers are also very easy to find within Iceland. In fact, Iceland is home to the oldest geyser in the world, Geysir. The climate of Iceland is described as subarctic, which is characterized with cold freezing winters and short cool summers. The average winter temperatures within Iceland are anywhere from 1.9 to -3.0॰C (35.4 - 26.6॰F), and the average summer temperatures range from 11.7 - 6.7॰C (53.1 - 44.1॰F).When the island of Iceland was first settled, there existed a vast number of forests, and it is believed that 30% of the entire land was covered in trees. However, this would change as the wood of these trees would be used for commercial purposes. Along with this, erosion greatly damaged the soils many used for farmlife, and today, many farms stand abandoned. New forests have been planted to replace those that have been cut down or destroyed. The tallest tree recorded in Iceland is a sitka spruce that stands at 25.2 meters (83 feet) tall.

When it comes to the animal life on Iceland, Arctic foxes are the only animal native to the land and not introduced by humans. Some wild mammals that can be found on Iceland are the Arctic fox, mink, mice, rabbits, rats, and reindeer. Other animals include the Icelandic sheep, chickens, goats, cattle, the Icelandic horse, and the Icelandic sheepdog. Polar bears are known to visit the country through icebergs from Greenland. There are also numerous fish species that live in the waters of Iceland, which is especially important as fishing is important to Iceland’s economy, accounting for half of the exports.

Surprisingly, Iceland is one of the only European countries that experiences population growth for the long term, as the country is currently experiencing a fertility rate of 2.1. Along with this, Iceland has a relatively young population for being a developed country, with one out of five people being 14 years old or younger. This is due to the rapid improvements in lifestyle that occurred during the 1900s.

Read More About Vintage Iceland Maps

Old Maps of Iceland
Explore our collection of Old Maps of Iceland.

Iceland is a nordic island country located in the North Atlantic Ocean. With the entire country spanning an area of around 103,000 square kilometers (40,000 square miles), Iceland is the 18th largest island in the world, and the 2nd largest in Europe following Great Britain. It is also the most sparsely populated country in all of Europe with a total population of around 371,580 inhabitants. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík, which holds around 65% of the entire population. Iceland is home to a representative democracy and parliamentary republic, and is also the first country in the world to have a political party completely founded and led by women. The current president of Iceland is Guðni Th. Jóhannesson.

The island of Iceland is very geologically active and is home to 130 volcanoes. Of these 130, only around 30 are active. The highest elevation located within Iceland can be found at Hvannadalshnúker, rising around 2,110 meters (or 6,923 feet). Along with volcanoes being common, hot springs and geysers are also very easy to find within Iceland. In fact, Iceland is home to the oldest geyser in the world, Geysir. The climate of Iceland is described as subarctic, which is characterized with cold freezing winters and short cool summers. The average winter temperatures within Iceland are anywhere from 1.9 to -3.0॰C (35.4 - 26.6॰F), and the average summer temperatures range from 11.7 - 6.7॰C (53.1 - 44.1॰F).When the island of Iceland was first settled, there existed a vast number of forests, and it is believed that 30% of the entire land was covered in trees. However, this would change as the wood of these trees would be used for commercial purposes. Along with this, erosion greatly damaged the soils many used for farmlife, and today, many farms stand abandoned. New forests have been planted to replace those that have been cut down or destroyed. The tallest tree recorded in Iceland is a sitka spruce that stands at 25.2 meters (83 feet) tall.

When it comes to the animal life on Iceland, Arctic foxes are the only animal native to the land and not introduced by humans. Some wild mammals that can be found on Iceland are the Arctic fox, mink, mice, rabbits, rats, and reindeer. Other animals include the Icelandic sheep, chickens, goats, cattle, the Icelandic horse, and the Icelandic sheepdog. Polar bears are known to visit the country through icebergs from Greenland. There are also numerous fish species that live in the waters of Iceland, which is especially important as fishing is important to Iceland’s economy, accounting for half of the exports.

Surprisingly, Iceland is one of the only European countries that experiences population growth for the long term, as the country is currently experiencing a fertility rate of 2.1. Along with this, Iceland has a relatively young population for being a developed country, with one out of five people being 14 years old or younger. This is due to the rapid improvements in lifestyle that occurred during the 1900s.

Find Your Perfect Vintage Map
Enter a city, county, state or country name in the search box below to get started.
Copyright 2023 © Ted’s Vintage Art / Blase Media LLC
My cart
Your cart is empty.

Looks like you haven't made a choice yet.