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Old Maps of South Dakota

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Vintage South Dakota Maps
The upper midwestern state of South Dakota, home to Mount Rushmore National Memorial, was the 40th state to join the Union in 1889.

Our historic map archives include many vintage maps of South Dakota and the Dakota Territory before statehood. We also have old maps that illustrate the geography of the Black Hills, where miners flocked to in the late 1800s when gold was discovered in the area. We also have maps of the following counties: Aurora, Bon Homme, Clark, Deuel, Hanson, Kingsbury, Lincoln, McCook, Miner, Minnehaha, Moody, and Union.

If you’re looking for a specific South Dakota map and don't see it on this page, contact us, and we’ll check our archives. While we have an extensive collection of vintage maps, there remain many more we still need to restore, and chances are, we'll have what you're looking for.
About South Dakota
The land now known as the state of South Dakota was part of the famous Louisiana Purchase of 1803. A year later, in 1804, the Lewis and Clark expedition established the first settlement at Fort Pierre. As happened with other early settlements of this time, there were clashes with Native Indians. Most notably was the Battle of Wounded Knee (also known as the Wounded Knee Massacre), where U.S. Army troops killed approximately 150 Sioux Indians.

Before the Louisiana Purchase, the land was first inhabited by Paleoindian hunter-gatherers, followed by a people known as the Mount Builders, then the Arikara, and later the Sioux tribes (the Lakota, the Eastern Dakota, and the Western Dakota). In the mid-1700s, Europeans arrived and claimed the land for France.

Millions of bison once roamed South Dakota before 1800, but they were relentlessly hunted and killed until around 1900. By that time, they were nearly extinct, with only about 1,000 thought to be left out of an estimated 60,000 million killed. Restoration efforts have helped the bison population grow today to several hundred thousand. South Dakota is a leading U.S. producer of bison, as well as pheasants. Agriculture is one of the state’s top industries—its main crops are corn, hay, soybeans, and wheat.

Tourism also fuels South Dakota’s economy, with over two million people alone visiting the state to see Mount Rushmore’s sculptures of the faces of Presidents Lincoln, Jefferson, Roosevelt, and Washington. The popularity of this national memorial has earned South Dakota the nickname of Mount Rushmore State. Then there are the dramatic landscapes of Badlands National Park and the underground complex of caves at Wind Cave National Park, which also draw visitors worldwide.

Wildlife is abundant in South Dakota, including buffalo, deer, elk, antelope, jackrabbits, and prairie dogs. Ring-necked pheasants (the state bird) and golden and bald eagles are also prevalent. And in the spring and summer months, wildflowers bloom across the state.

Finally, did you know the world’s largest mountain carving is located in the Black Hills of South Dakota? It’s a carving of Crazy Horse that’s been in progress since 1948, and when it’s finally finished, it’ll be considered the Eighth Wonder of the World. The final carving will depict the Oglala Lakota warrior on a horse, pointing to his tribal land.

Read More About Old Maps of South Dakota

Vintage South Dakota Maps
The upper midwestern state of South Dakota, home to Mount Rushmore National Memorial, was the 40th state to join the Union in 1889.

Our historic map archives include many vintage maps of South Dakota and the Dakota Territory before statehood. We also have old maps that illustrate the geography of the Black Hills, where miners flocked to in the late 1800s when gold was discovered in the area. We also have maps of the following counties: Aurora, Bon Homme, Clark, Deuel, Hanson, Kingsbury, Lincoln, McCook, Miner, Minnehaha, Moody, and Union.

If you’re looking for a specific South Dakota map and don't see it on this page, contact us, and we’ll check our archives. While we have an extensive collection of vintage maps, there remain many more we still need to restore, and chances are, we'll have what you're looking for.
About South Dakota
The land now known as the state of South Dakota was part of the famous Louisiana Purchase of 1803. A year later, in 1804, the Lewis and Clark expedition established the first settlement at Fort Pierre. As happened with other early settlements of this time, there were clashes with Native Indians. Most notably was the Battle of Wounded Knee (also known as the Wounded Knee Massacre), where U.S. Army troops killed approximately 150 Sioux Indians.

Before the Louisiana Purchase, the land was first inhabited by Paleoindian hunter-gatherers, followed by a people known as the Mount Builders, then the Arikara, and later the Sioux tribes (the Lakota, the Eastern Dakota, and the Western Dakota). In the mid-1700s, Europeans arrived and claimed the land for France.

Millions of bison once roamed South Dakota before 1800, but they were relentlessly hunted and killed until around 1900. By that time, they were nearly extinct, with only about 1,000 thought to be left out of an estimated 60,000 million killed. Restoration efforts have helped the bison population grow today to several hundred thousand. South Dakota is a leading U.S. producer of bison, as well as pheasants. Agriculture is one of the state’s top industries—its main crops are corn, hay, soybeans, and wheat.

Tourism also fuels South Dakota’s economy, with over two million people alone visiting the state to see Mount Rushmore’s sculptures of the faces of Presidents Lincoln, Jefferson, Roosevelt, and Washington. The popularity of this national memorial has earned South Dakota the nickname of Mount Rushmore State. Then there are the dramatic landscapes of Badlands National Park and the underground complex of caves at Wind Cave National Park, which also draw visitors worldwide.

Wildlife is abundant in South Dakota, including buffalo, deer, elk, antelope, jackrabbits, and prairie dogs. Ring-necked pheasants (the state bird) and golden and bald eagles are also prevalent. And in the spring and summer months, wildflowers bloom across the state.

Finally, did you know the world’s largest mountain carving is located in the Black Hills of South Dakota? It’s a carving of Crazy Horse that’s been in progress since 1948, and when it’s finally finished, it’ll be considered the Eighth Wonder of the World. The final carving will depict the Oglala Lakota warrior on a horse, pointing to his tribal land.

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