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Old Maps of Oklahoma

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    Vintage Oklahoma Maps
    Oklahoma, nicknamed the Sooner State, became a state in 1907, and since then, many beautiful, antique maps have been created over the years.

    In our historic map archives, we have dozens of old Oklahoma maps featuring every county, including Oklahoma, Tulsa, Cleveland, Canadian, Comanche, Comanche, Rogers, Payne, Wagoner, Pottawatomie, and Creek.The most commonly requested maps for the state are typically for the cities of Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Norman, Broken Arrow, Lawton, Edmond, Moore, Midwest City, Enid, and Stillwater.

    If you’re looking for a specific Oklahoma city or region map and can’t find it, contact us, and we will check our archives.
    About Oklahoma
    There’s nothing bigger in Oklahoma than football—ask any Oklahoman, and they’ll say their love of the game starts from the cradle. The state has a powerhouse college football team, the Oklahoma Sooners. They hold seven national championships, boast seven Heisman Trophy winners, and have had 23 members inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. And that’s not even counting their record winning streak of 47 straight victories. 

    Outside of sports, the state’s military presence centers around Fort Sill, an Oklahoma Army post that's home to the U.S. Army's Field Artillery. Its history dates back to the 1800s, and it's had a role in every major American conflict since then. Basic Combat Training is held at Fort Sill for Army recruits, and the post is also used to train troops in artillery.

    The oil and natural gas industry is the heart of Oklahoma's economy. The state is famous for its oil wells, and the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City even sits directly on an oil field (it’s the only capitol building in the world that holds this distinction). 

    Other major industries in Oklahoma include aerospace and defense, agriculture, automotive, bioscience, and manufacturing. And among the companies headquartered in Oklahoma, you’ll find Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores, Sonic Drive-In Restaurants, Hobby Lobby, and rental car companies Alamo Rent a Car, National Car Rental, and Dollar-Thrifty.

    Although Oklahoma is known for its prairie grasslands home to bison and prairie dogs, you might be surprised to learn that forests cover over a quarter of the state. In the Ouachita Mountains in southeastern Oklahoma, for example, you'll find pine, oak, and hickory trees, as well as the black bears and foxes that live among them. Oklahoma also has more man-made lakes than any other state—over 200.

    Turning to tourism, road trippers looking for a bit of nostalgia will find it on Route 66. Oklahoma has the nation's longest driveable stretch of the famous route, with plenty of quirky attractions and charming roadside diners along the way.

    Museum-goers will find several in Oklahoma City. You can step back into the Wild West at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, view fine art at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, or learn about the banjo’s history at the American Banjo Museum. 

    On a somber note, Oklahoma City is also home to the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. It was built on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building site, which was destroyed by a deadly terrorist truck bombing in 1995. The memorial honors the victims, survivors, and rescuers from that dark day in the state’s history.

    More About These Maps

    Vintage Oklahoma Maps
    Oklahoma, nicknamed the Sooner State, became a state in 1907, and since then, many beautiful, antique maps have been created over the years.

    In our historic map archives, we have dozens of old Oklahoma maps featuring every county, including Oklahoma, Tulsa, Cleveland, Canadian, Comanche, Comanche, Rogers, Payne, Wagoner, Pottawatomie, and Creek.The most commonly requested maps for the state are typically for the cities of Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Norman, Broken Arrow, Lawton, Edmond, Moore, Midwest City, Enid, and Stillwater.

    If you’re looking for a specific Oklahoma city or region map and can’t find it, contact us, and we will check our archives.
    About Oklahoma
    There’s nothing bigger in Oklahoma than football—ask any Oklahoman, and they’ll say their love of the game starts from the cradle. The state has a powerhouse college football team, the Oklahoma Sooners. They hold seven national championships, boast seven Heisman Trophy winners, and have had 23 members inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. And that’s not even counting their record winning streak of 47 straight victories. 

    Outside of sports, the state’s military presence centers around Fort Sill, an Oklahoma Army post that's home to the U.S. Army's Field Artillery. Its history dates back to the 1800s, and it's had a role in every major American conflict since then. Basic Combat Training is held at Fort Sill for Army recruits, and the post is also used to train troops in artillery.

    The oil and natural gas industry is the heart of Oklahoma's economy. The state is famous for its oil wells, and the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City even sits directly on an oil field (it’s the only capitol building in the world that holds this distinction). 

    Other major industries in Oklahoma include aerospace and defense, agriculture, automotive, bioscience, and manufacturing. And among the companies headquartered in Oklahoma, you’ll find Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores, Sonic Drive-In Restaurants, Hobby Lobby, and rental car companies Alamo Rent a Car, National Car Rental, and Dollar-Thrifty.

    Although Oklahoma is known for its prairie grasslands home to bison and prairie dogs, you might be surprised to learn that forests cover over a quarter of the state. In the Ouachita Mountains in southeastern Oklahoma, for example, you'll find pine, oak, and hickory trees, as well as the black bears and foxes that live among them. Oklahoma also has more man-made lakes than any other state—over 200.

    Turning to tourism, road trippers looking for a bit of nostalgia will find it on Route 66. Oklahoma has the nation's longest driveable stretch of the famous route, with plenty of quirky attractions and charming roadside diners along the way.

    Museum-goers will find several in Oklahoma City. You can step back into the Wild West at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, view fine art at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, or learn about the banjo’s history at the American Banjo Museum. 

    On a somber note, Oklahoma City is also home to the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. It was built on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building site, which was destroyed by a deadly terrorist truck bombing in 1995. The memorial honors the victims, survivors, and rescuers from that dark day in the state’s history.

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